Kate Davies is a writer, a maker and an academic specialising in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century literature and material culture.

 

Goodbye, Dolly

 

'We have naught for death but toys'

W.B. Yeats

Several hundred feet beneath the streets of Edinburgh's Old Town, a doll sits in a cold, dark room. The tattered plaid she wears is showing signs of age. Her limbs are dirty and her hair is white with dust. Gathered around her are hundreds of companions. There are Barbies and beanie-babies and several Raggedy-Anns. Stuffed animals jostle alongside plastic infants; painted wooden soldiers smile up at porcelain princesses. What are they, this dusty jumble of toys piled five feet high? What brought them here together? In 1992, Japanese psychic, Aiko Gibo, visited Edinburgh's re-discovered city-beneath-the-city and reportedly felt the tugging hands of a girl abandoned there to die in a plague year. Gibo comforted the restless ghost with the tartan doll, leaving her a curiously nationalist playmate. Since then, numerous visitors to what is now known as Annie's room have done the same. What are we to make of this shrine, this spontaneous doll-memorial to the ghost of a girl no-one remembers? Are we moved or repelled by Annie's room?

All cultures mark the boundary between life and death with imitative rituals. Dolls are familiar figures in funerals across time. The tombs of the ancient dead are filled with effigies whose assumed purpose ranges from the talismanic to the admonitory. Children use dolls to play at death, mimicking grief and burial. Dolls, indeed, look like death. It is not just that in them we find an appropriate figure for our mourning, but, in their cold imperturbability, they seem like corpses themselves. The doll-corpse link is explored in Andrew Kötting's playful and serious project, In the Wake of a Deadad (2006). Intrigued by his reaction to his father's corpse and memory, Kötting reinvented several imitative rituals, which included inviting responses to photographs of his dad in stages of life and death; laying himself out as mock-corpse and paternal offrendas in the Mexican Day-of-the-Dead; and creating an enormous inflatable Deadad doll with which he lived and travelled for several months.

With a different sort of wit and tenderness, Tabitha Kyoko Moses also explores the humanity and deathliness of dolls. Over the past few years, Moses has amassed an eclectic assortment of doll-objects from charity shops and jumble sales "I wasn't interested in a particular genre of doll," she says, "or in creating a collection or a history. But suddenly I discovered I had a lot of them. It was almost as if they found me." The dolls that "found" Moses are those that are most "lost": blemished or dismembered, loved or tortured to the point of collapse. Inspired by a mummified girl she encountered during a residence at Bolton Museum, Moses initially began to re-fashion the dolls as consolatory gifts for this long-dead and lonely child. But, perhaps like the toys in Annie's room - gathering dust and becoming, together, something more than themselves - her dolls began to take on a material life of their own. In a process of wrapping and nurturing she compares to "laying out a dead body" Moses swaddles her dolls in lagging, plastic, printed cotton lawn, stiff leather, string, and human hair. A doll whose jolly bonnet and rosy cheeks form a startling contrast to her eyes' bald sockets is fondly adorned with a manx-cat brooch, suggesting both completion and absence. Some of the dolls have the cosy air of children sleeping. Others appear to be slightly disgruntled, uselessly struggling against the fabric bundles in which they find themselves enclosed.

The fabric wrappings are crucial to the new life that Moses lends her dolls. These textiles are both ornament and container: the dolls' soft coffin and their decorative memorial. Moses binds a startled bride wearing full wedding regalia in dark linen. In her black shroud she becomes a figure of arrested potential, conveying the ritual proximity of marriage and death. Moses further excavates the deathliness of dolls with the use of x-ray photography. A light-box image of the bride reveals her to be pierced with several pins. She now resonates with murderous curiosity, internal anguish, guilt, and fascination. For who, in moments of dark childhood fantasy, has not killed their dolls?

In their lovely, yet deeply disturbing ordinariness, Moses' dolls and textiles recall the partially covered corpse in Wallace Stevens' poem The Emperor of Ice-Cream:

Take from the dresser of deal,

Lacking the three glass knobs, that sheet

On which she embroidered fantails once

And spread it so as to cover her face.

If her horny feet protrude, they come

To show how cold she is, and dumb.

Stevens' corpse is an object of the everyday. In her cold immobility she reminds us of death's easy finality. Yet, like Moses' cared-for dolls, she also suggests the mute compassion of the world of things. We feel the careless weight of her hands on the well-worn dresser; her fingers' quick movement through the stitches of the modest cloth that now decorates her countenance. The dead woman cannot speak, and yet the meanings of her selfhood are silently carried to us in that fantail-embroidered sheet.

In Untitled (2006) Moses uses stitch as a communicative medium between life and death. These dismembered limbs, with their immaculate embroidery, are textiles of breathtaking beauty. Yet out of the gorgeous doll-things protrude ugly human bones. Doll and corpse become one in objects that are both compelling and repellent. Moses' embroidered calico, fashioned with such skill and care, lends respect and tenderness to the bone, and the bone in turn enhances the meanings of the fabric with its own brand of the grotesque. In complete contrast to Cindy Sherman's doll-art which, in the public glare of her camera, strives unsuccessfully to be poignant as well as disgusting, Moses's dolls achieve this by expressing themselves intimately, stitching their audience up with whispers.

So, to return to where we began, perhaps Tabitha Moses' dolls tell us something abut how to feel in Annie's room. What's interesting when one begins to look closely at the piled-up array of gifts in that dark tenement is their different associations. Some have been left with evident care (a pricey bébé) others with apparent thoughtlessness (a screen wipe). So many of Annie's toys seem just misplaced or random: plastic binoculars, a Westlife CD, an enormous grinning bear. Together, though, these things have transformed a space that is supposed to be terribly spooky and lent it a spectacular ordinariness. Annie's room has a stark materiality in which there is a pathos that exceeds, or defies, the uncanny. Like Tabitha Moses' dolls, Annie's too are part of the kindly world of things.

 

Thanks to Lisa Helsby of Mary Kings Close. Visitors also leave donations in Annie's room which last year raised a staggering £10,000 for the Edinburgh Sick Kids hospital.